Even the lightest of physical activity can help reduce disability

Here’s a study that disputes the old adage, “no pain, no gain.” According to a study published in British Medical Journal, results indicated that light-intensity physical activity is beneficial. Such activity can decrease your risk for the onset of osteoarthritis disability, or, if you already have that, can decrease the progression of the disability. The study was specific to knee osteoarthritis.

Dorothy Dunlop, buy avodart professor of medicine at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, points out that these findings can encourage patients who cannot increase their level of physical activity because of health limitations. She said, “We were delighted to see that more time spent during the day, simply moving your body, even at a light intensity, may reduce disability.” Read the full article here.

What Healthcare Inequalities Mean for You

If you are African-American or Hispanic, will that make a difference in which hospital you choose when you need a hospital? Do you believe that equality of treatment should be considered as a factor in what makes a hospital excellent? Dr. Louis W. Sullivan and Dr. Augustus A. White, III, suggest that if U.S. News and World Report were to include equality of treatment as a factor in their www.ourhealthissues.com/product/tegretol/ ranking of the best hospitals, then more hospitals would become sensitive to the problem of unequal care. This in turn could improve healthcare delivery to minority and underserved populations. And, a ranking of hospitals based on equality of service might guide you in selecting the hospital where you feel you will receive the best treatment.  Read more of the article, published in CNN Opinion, here.

More Pain as You Gain?

How does obesity affect the pain of osteoarthritis (OA)? It may sound like a simple question, but this article reports on a study that sought to determine whether patients with a higher body mass index (BMI), a measure of weight in relation to height, experienced greater pain than their less-obese friends and neighbors who also suffered with osteoarthritis.

Some key points:

  • The heavier you are, the more likely you are to develop osteoarthritis.
  • Osteoarthritis is not necessarily buy avodart online more prevalent today than it has been in the past.
  • Patients with a higher BMI reported more pain, regardless of the severity of their joint damage.
  • For each level of arthritis severity, pain scores were higher among obese patients than among non-obese patients.
  • Hormones associated with obesity may affect the severity of knee arthritis and pain.
  • A decrease in body weight could decrease arthritis pain.

Read the full article here.

 

Where Race, Ethnicity and Medicine Intersect

Has America become a “postracial” society? Virtual Mentor, The American Medical Association Journal of Ethics asks, is a “postracial” society achievable—or even desirable? As our understanding of race and ethnicity evolves, doctors must learn from the past and remain alert to the ways in which they may be harming or failing patients today. Read the full article here.