Manage diabetes and joint pain with movement

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 47 percent of people with arthritis also have diabetes. The most common type of arthritis is Osteoarthritis and in many cases, it is caused by excessive weight gain. The weight gain increases the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Having diabetes can potentially damage joint surfaces. The extra glucose sticks to surfaces of the joint and inhibits movement and leads to stiffness, greater risk of physical injury and falls. People who experience joint damage have increased pain and reduce physical activity. Exercise and the loss of just 15 pounds is known to reduce pain by 50 percent. The more exercise and movement, the less joint pain and relief of diabetes symptoms. Suggestions for prevention and treatment include stretching exercises, resistance training, aerobic exercise, improving glucose control, losing a few pounds, use of heat and cold therapy, and keeping affective joints warm in cold weather. Moving your body is one of the essential key to managing diabetes.

Miss Moti-vation by Kripa Joshi

 

Julie Kneeder, EdD, MS, RN and Tamara Huff, MD

paper chain

Hispanic physicians must take a leadership role for true health equity

Are You A Lemon Or A Cherry? Straight Talk at the NBNA

A Spiritual Reflection On Our Ownership to Health

Nurse's week

Happy May! As we welcome spring with new bright green grass and colorful, fragrant flowers; it’s time to celebrate two important events. The first of which was Nurses Week (May 6 – 12th).

Nurse’s week  celebrates the many accomplishments of this notable profession. President Ronald Reagan signed a proclamation on March 25, 1982 proclaiming May 6, 1982 to be “National Recognition Day for Nurses.” The week ends on May 12th, which is the birthday of the world’s most famous nurse, Florence Nightingale.   While nursing has changed through the years and our roles expanded, nursing is still ranked by Gallup as the most trusted profession.

This year’s theme is:  “Nursing: the Balance of Mind, Body, and Spirit.” Many healthcare organizations recognize the value nurses bring to the healthcare arena by acknowledging their nursing team and recognizing those who have gone above and beyond.  There are over 3.6 million nurses in the United online pharmacy States who serve to heal, educate comfort, console and lead.

The second event I want to highlight is Mother’s Day on Sunday, May 14th.  It’s a day where we take the time to acknowledge our mothers and show them how much we appreciate them.  This year make a commitment and have a healthy care conversation with your mom.  Our moms are so busy taking care of others, they forget to take care of themselves.

Women are disproportionately impacted by joint pain and arthritis.  Physician diagnosed arthritis is more common in women and women of color suffer more severe joint pain. Physical activity helps relieve joint pain and improve physical function and can break the vicious cycle.

So this Mother’s Day, forget the chocolate and take a walk with your mom.   It could lead to a longer healthier life for you both.

 

Why I Believe: Tamara Huff

  Orthopedic Surgeon Tamara Huff is an engaging surgeon in Waycross, GA. She is an ardent supporter of creating ways to engaging patients in their health care. Why are you committed to the Movement is life Caucus?   I believe I can contribute and help the Hispanic and Latino Community to get health care and improve […]

More Pain as You Gain?

How does obesity affect the pain of osteoarthritis (OA)? It may sound like a simple question, but this article reports on a study that sought to determine whether patients with a higher body mass index (BMI), a measure of weight in relation to height, experienced greater pain than their less-obese friends and neighbors who also suffered with osteoarthritis.

Some key points:

  • The heavier you are, the more likely you are to develop osteoarthritis.
  • Osteoarthritis is not necessarily buy avodart online more prevalent today than it has been in the past.
  • Patients with a higher BMI reported more pain, regardless of the severity of their joint damage.
  • For each level of arthritis severity, pain scores were higher among obese patients than among non-obese patients.
  • Hormones associated with obesity may affect the severity of knee arthritis and pain.
  • A decrease in body weight could decrease arthritis pain.

Read the full article here.