Manage diabetes and joint pain with movement

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 47 percent of people with arthritis also have diabetes. The most common type of arthritis is Osteoarthritis and in many cases, it is caused by excessive weight gain. The weight gain increases the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Having diabetes can potentially damage joint surfaces. The extra glucose sticks to surfaces of the joint and inhibits movement and leads to stiffness, greater risk of physical injury and falls. People who experience joint damage have increased pain and reduce physical activity. Exercise and the loss of just 15 pounds is known to reduce pain by 50 percent. The more exercise and movement, the less joint pain and relief of diabetes symptoms. Suggestions for prevention and treatment include stretching exercises, resistance training, aerobic exercise, improving glucose control, losing a few pounds, use of heat and cold therapy, and keeping affective joints warm in cold weather. Moving your body is one of the essential key to managing diabetes.

Miss Moti-vation by Kripa Joshi

 

Julie Kneeder, EdD, MS, RN and Tamara Huff, MD

Learn more about church health ministries on HealthUnlocked. 

Does your church now have a health ministry or healthy activities?

One church that does have a health ministry is the Grace Baptist Church in Mount Vernon, New York City. Grace is a vibrant and diverse church located in the heart of one of the world’s greatest metropolitan areas. Reverend Richardson has led Grace Baptist since 1975. He has been a leader and catalyst for civil rights over many decades.

Like many campaigners, he sees initiatives to improve health as part of a broader civil rights movement. We were honored to have Reverend Richardson give a keynote speech at the recent Movement is Life Conference and it was inspirational. Learn more about church health ministries on HealthUnlocked. 

illustration of woman doing yoga

Daily Practice of Mindful Behaviors

Getting to and maintaining a healthy weight involves the daily practice of mindful behaviors. Mindfulness is all about making conscious decisions with full awareness and acceptance of your emotions and fears. It is about being present in the moment and making a healthful decision in that moment.

Simple daily habits like eating fruits and vegetables, fish, lean meats, & healthy fats, controlling portion size, using alcohol judiciously, quitting tobacco and keeping moving will start you on the path to weight loss, and a healthier lifestyle.

Movement is absolutely mission critical. This is true not only from an energy or calorie expenditure perspective. Staying mobile improves every aspect of your wellbeing. Whether you are walking, dancing, or skipping rope physical activity affects your heart rate, your breathing, your circulation and your muscles, bones, and joints. You’ll sleep better, too. And, keeping moving has the added benefit of lifting your mood. You can kiss that late afternoon sluggishness or evening letdown goodbye.

Getting to your goal weight, and more importantly getting into a lifestyle of healthy habits is easier than it seems. Grab a friend and get started today!

Charla Johnson, RN, MSN, ONC and James E. Wood, Jr. MD

Learn more about GirlTrek

GirlTrek is a major national health initiative aimed at getting black women and girls walking together, and was featured during our recent “Movement is Life” conference. They have nearly 250,000 followers on Facebook. We caught up with Onika Jervis from GirlTrek after the conference to learn more about the initiative. Onika had given an inspiring […]

Are You A Lemon Or A Cherry? Straight Talk at the NBNA

A Spiritual Reflection On Our Ownership to Health

Why I Believe: Tamara Huff

  Orthopedic Surgeon Tamara Huff is an engaging surgeon in Waycross, GA. She is an ardent supporter of creating ways to engaging patients in their health care. Why are you committed to the Movement is life Caucus?   I believe I can contribute and help the Hispanic and Latino Community to get health care and improve […]

Why I Believe: Kristine Lohr

Kristine M. Lohr MD, MS is a professor of medicine and a rheumatologist at the University of Kentucky. We asked her a few questions about why she is a member of Movement is Life Caucus.

Why are you committed to the Movement is life Caucus? Many of the patients I see would benefit from the outreach of the Movement is Life Caucus.

Why are fighting disparities important? I’ve always worked at safety net healthcare institutions and I am concerned about the potential and adverse effects of current and future health policies.

Since the caucus is about movement, can you tell us one thing you do in your health and wellness journey? I get a lot of benefit from riding my horse, playing with dogs learn yoga and focusing on spirituality.