Why I Believe: Kristine Lohr

Kristine M. Lohr MD, MS is a professor of medicine and a rheumatologist at the University of Kentucky. We asked her a few questions about why she is a member of Movement is Life Caucus.

Why are you committed to the Movement is life Caucus? Many of the patients I see would benefit from the outreach of the Movement is Life Caucus.

Why are fighting disparities important? I’ve always worked at safety net healthcare institutions and I am concerned about the potential and adverse effects of current and future health policies.

Since the caucus is about movement, can you tell us one thing you do in your health and wellness journey? I get a lot of benefit from riding my horse, playing with dogs learn yoga and focusing on spirituality.

 

Why I Believe: Erik Santos, MD, PhD

Recently we sat down with Dr. and PhD. Erick Santos an Orthopedic Surgeon from Corpus Christi Texas to discuss why he is a proud member of the Movement is Life Caucus and their efforts to fight health care disparities. Born and raised in Puerto Rico, he is former United State Air Force flight surgeon.

Why are you committed to the Movement is life Caucus?   I want to end health care disparities having seen them first hand as a surgeon in South Texas.

Why are fighting disparities important? Fighting discrimination and advocating for the good of my patients is the right buy cheap avodart canada thing to do. By eliminating disparities we bring better health to all.

What is one way to fight unconscious bias? Education, communication and transparency are key. It will also be important to know that sharing will also work to get the message out.

Since the caucus is about movement, can you tell us one thing you do in your health and wellness journey? I exercise three-four times per week and walking four miles on the treadmill.

What is one health and wellness resource you value? I think a great resource is the website: www.ortholnfo.org.

 

 

Can Exercise Help You Tolerate Pain?

New York Times health blogger Gretchen Reynolds shares the results of a new study indicating that regular exercise may alter how a person experiences pain. The longer we continue to work out, the new findings suggest, the greater our tolerance for discomfort can grow.

Scientists have known that strenuous exercise briefly and acutely dulls pain. As muscles begin to ache during a prolonged workout, scientists have found, the body typically releases natural opiates, such as endorphins, and other substances that can slightly dampen the discomfort. This effect, which scientists refer to as exercise-induced buy avodart uk hypoalgesia, usually begins during the workout and lingers for perhaps 20 or 30 minutes afterward.

Pain threshold is the point at which we start to feel pain. Pain tolerance is the amount of time that we can withstand the pain, before we cease doing whatever is causing it. The study found that volunteers who exercised had no change to their pain threshold but did have increased pain tolerance.

According to the lead researcher on the study, the findings “could be meaningful for people struggling with chronic pain.”

Read the entire article here.