Why Do Doctors Tell Me to Exercise and They Know I Can’t?

Ever hear your healthcare provider say these dreaded words to you?

“You’re overweight and you need to exercise and watch your diet,” Easier said than done, right? Sometimes you might look at the person saying that to you and think to yourself, “YOU need to lose some weight yourself!!”

The stigma of being called overweight, obese, and morbidly obese are clearly enough to not make anyone feel good about themselves. This can then spiral downward into depression, which also adds to the problem. I don’t believe anyone WANTS to be overweight. If you’ve ever been chastised by a healthcare provider regarding your weight, or simply told you need to diet and exercise without any further instructions, you may decide to postpone seeking healthcare or avoid interacting with healthcare providers.

Losing weight is like a two-sided coin. Cutting back on sweets, carbs, and any other vices one might have will surely help with weight loss, but that’s only half of the battle. It’s that other side of the coin that seems to get to most people. That dreaded eight letter word….EXERCISE.

The dictionary defines exercise as “to engage in physical activity to sustain or improve health and fitness.” They key words here are “physical activity.” That can include a plethora of things that one could do. It does not necessarily mean having to join a gym or other fitness classes to engage in physical activity.

As a primary care physician practicing Internal Medicine, I am on the front line when it comes to seeing patients who are struggling with their weight. Being overweight or obese is usually accompanied by other co-morbid conditions including musculoskeletal diseases, such as arthritis. The combination of these two things oftentimes makes it very difficult for patients to feel that they can indeed exercise because of pain.

If we substitute the word “MOVEMENT” for “EXERCISE” we quickly see that engaging in some sort of physical activity can then take on a whole new meaning. If you’re suffering from knee and hip pain, marching in place for 10 to 15 minutes a day and then working your way up in time is a start. To add in a little bit of cardio, take some soup cans and do arm raises. You can also do these things even while sitting. These are forms of MOVEMENT that can be done right in the comfort of your own home.

Don’t let the word EXERCISE stop you from MOVING towards your goal of losing weight and being physically active.

Carla Harwell, MD and Millicent Gorham, PhD (Hon.), FAAN, MBA

Manage diabetes and joint pain with movement

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 47 percent of people with arthritis also have diabetes. The most common type of arthritis is Osteoarthritis and in many cases, it is caused by excessive weight gain. The weight gain increases the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Having diabetes can potentially damage joint surfaces. The extra glucose sticks to surfaces of the joint and inhibits movement and leads to stiffness, greater risk of physical injury and falls. People who experience joint damage have increased pain and reduce physical activity. Exercise and the loss of just 15 pounds is known to reduce pain by 50 percent. The more exercise and movement, the less joint pain and relief of diabetes symptoms. Suggestions for prevention and treatment include stretching exercises, resistance training, aerobic exercise, improving glucose control, losing a few pounds, use of heat and cold therapy, and keeping affective joints warm in cold weather. Moving your body is one of the essential key to managing diabetes.

Miss Moti-vation by Kripa Joshi

 

Julie Kneeder, EdD, MS, RN and Tamara Huff, MD

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Hispanic physicians must take a leadership role for true health equity

More Pain as You Gain?

How does obesity affect the pain of osteoarthritis (OA)? It may sound like a simple question, but this article reports on a study that sought to determine whether patients with a higher body mass index (BMI), a measure of weight in relation to height, experienced greater pain than their less-obese friends and neighbors who also suffered with osteoarthritis.

Some key points:

  • The heavier you are, the more likely you are to develop osteoarthritis.
  • Osteoarthritis is not necessarily buy avodart online more prevalent today than it has been in the past.
  • Patients with a higher BMI reported more pain, regardless of the severity of their joint damage.
  • For each level of arthritis severity, pain scores were higher among obese patients than among non-obese patients.
  • Hormones associated with obesity may affect the severity of knee arthritis and pain.
  • A decrease in body weight could decrease arthritis pain.

Read the full article here.

 

Slimming Down — Alone or Together?

By Judith Ohikuare, in The Atlantic:

Consider the importance of finding a supportive community: weight loss is often considered a personal journey, but the best outcomes are the result of group efforts. Does NBC’s The Biggest Loser make you feel like getting in shape is meant to be publicly announced and privately executed? Emphasizing the importance of community to lessen our society’s where to buy avodart high rate of obesity is the goal of Drs. Walter Willett and Malissa Wood, the co-authors of Thinfluence: the powerful and surprising effect friends, family, work, and environment have on weight.

Read more of this article to learn about the influence of friends, family and public policy on weight loss. 

CDC Map Reveals Startling Obesity Trend in the U.S.

A “heat map” released by the CDC reveals the staggering rate of obesity in the United States and how obesity rates have increased dramatically over recent decades.

As seen in the video below, Americans are gaining weight at an alarming rate. Available data show that in 1985, most states had less generic avodart than 14% of their population considered obese—and many, less than 10%. According to the 2008 data, most states had more than a quarter of their population considered overweight—and some more than 30%. One can only speculate how these numbers will increase if nothing is done to reverse these trends.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MePYupyJ-Bg