Osteoarthritis Patients are Better Off Walking

Orthopedics This Week reports on a study finding that osteoarthritis patients benefit from walking and should not fear that walking might cause increased damage to their joints. “People with osteoarthritis can decrease the possibility of developing physical limitations by walking more,” according to physical therapist Daniel K. White, Sc.D., PT, of Boston University, and his colleagues.

Key points:

  • Increased steps (1,000 more steps per day) were associated with a lower risk for later buy avodart online uk deterioration whether assessed on an objective performance-based measure or on a self-report measure.
  • Walkers who totaled 5,000 to 7,500 steps per day cut their risk of complications from osteoarthritis in half.
  • Less than one-third of primary care physicians advise their patients with osteoarthritis to walk.
  • White and his group suggest that physicians who are recommending walking to their patients set an initial goal of 3,000 steps per day.

Read the full article here.

 

Even the lightest of physical activity can help reduce disability

Here’s a study that disputes the old adage, “no pain, no gain.” According to a study published in British Medical Journal, results indicated that light-intensity physical activity is beneficial. Such activity can decrease your risk for the onset of osteoarthritis disability, or, if you already have that, can decrease the progression of the disability. The study was specific to knee osteoarthritis.

Dorothy Dunlop, buy avodart professor of medicine at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, points out that these findings can encourage patients who cannot increase their level of physical activity because of health limitations. She said, “We were delighted to see that more time spent during the day, simply moving your body, even at a light intensity, may reduce disability.” Read the full article here.

More Pain as You Gain?

How does obesity affect the pain of osteoarthritis (OA)? It may sound like a simple question, but this article reports on a study that sought to determine whether patients with a higher body mass index (BMI), a measure of weight in relation to height, experienced greater pain than their less-obese friends and neighbors who also suffered with osteoarthritis.

Some key points:

  • The heavier you are, the more likely you are to develop osteoarthritis.
  • Osteoarthritis is not necessarily buy avodart online more prevalent today than it has been in the past.
  • Patients with a higher BMI reported more pain, regardless of the severity of their joint damage.
  • For each level of arthritis severity, pain scores were higher among obese patients than among non-obese patients.
  • Hormones associated with obesity may affect the severity of knee arthritis and pain.
  • A decrease in body weight could decrease arthritis pain.

Read the full article here.