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Why I Believe: Tamara Huff

  Orthopedic Surgeon Tamara Huff is an engaging surgeon in Waycross, GA. She is an ardent supporter of creating ways to engaging patients in their health care. Why are you committed to the Movement is life Caucus?   I believe I can contribute and help the Hispanic and Latino Community to get health care and improve […]

Why I Believe: Jannifer Harper

Dr. Jannifer Harper is a board certified Internist and Vice President and Chief Clinical Officer at Anthem and shared with us her reasons why she is part of the Movement is Life Caucus and our efforts to fight health care disparities

Why are you committed to the Movement is life Caucus?   I am committed to the Movement is Life Caucus because it is our future.

Why are fighting disparities important? To improve the health of our country’s population to in order to leave a healthier buy generic avodart generation for our children.

What is one way to fight unconscious bias? You have to spend time with people who are different than you.

Since the caucus is about movement, can you tell us one thing you do in your health and wellness journey? I enjoy walking and using various fitness apps to track my food intake.

What is one health and wellness resource you value? I value relationships like the ones I have with my family.

 

Why I Believe: Kristine Lohr

Kristine M. Lohr MD, MS is a professor of medicine and a rheumatologist at the University of Kentucky. We asked her a few questions about why she is a member of Movement is Life Caucus.

Why are you committed to the Movement is life Caucus? Many of the patients I see would benefit from the outreach of the Movement is Life Caucus.

Why are fighting disparities important? I’ve always worked at safety net healthcare institutions and I am concerned about the potential and adverse effects of current and future health policies.

Since the caucus is about movement, can you tell us one thing you do in your health and wellness journey? I get a lot of benefit from riding my horse, playing with dogs learn yoga and focusing on spirituality.

 

Why I Believe: Erik Santos, MD, PhD

Recently we sat down with Dr. and PhD. Erick Santos an Orthopedic Surgeon from Corpus Christi Texas to discuss why he is a proud member of the Movement is Life Caucus and their efforts to fight health care disparities. Born and raised in Puerto Rico, he is former United State Air Force flight surgeon.

Why are you committed to the Movement is life Caucus?   I want to end health care disparities having seen them first hand as a surgeon in South Texas.

Why are fighting disparities important? Fighting discrimination and advocating for the good of my patients is the right buy cheap avodart canada thing to do. By eliminating disparities we bring better health to all.

What is one way to fight unconscious bias? Education, communication and transparency are key. It will also be important to know that sharing will also work to get the message out.

Since the caucus is about movement, can you tell us one thing you do in your health and wellness journey? I exercise three-four times per week and walking four miles on the treadmill.

What is one health and wellness resource you value? I think a great resource is the website: www.ortholnfo.org.

 

 

Even the lightest of physical activity can help reduce disability

Here’s a study that disputes the old adage, “no pain, no gain.” According to a study published in British Medical Journal, results indicated that light-intensity physical activity is beneficial. Such activity can decrease your risk for the onset of osteoarthritis disability, or, if you already have that, can decrease the progression of the disability. The study was specific to knee osteoarthritis.

Dorothy Dunlop, buy avodart professor of medicine at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, points out that these findings can encourage patients who cannot increase their level of physical activity because of health limitations. She said, “We were delighted to see that more time spent during the day, simply moving your body, even at a light intensity, may reduce disability.” Read the full article here.

The Truth about Arthritis: You could become disabled.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, arthritis is the most common cause of disability in the United States. An estimated 50 million people currently suffer from some form of doctor-diagnosed arthritis. By the year 2030, that number is expected to increase to 67 million. These numbers are disproportionally high among women and minorities. Arthritis is also more common among obese people.

What’s the problem?

A little pain in your knees might not seem like much cause for concern, but arthritis can worsen over time—impacting your mobility and your quality of life.

  • High risk. If you are obese or have had a knee injury, your risk of developing arthritis is higher—46% of obese people and 57% of those with knee injuries will develop arthritis.
  • Disability. It starts slowly. Maybe one day you can’t climb stairs without pain or you can’t walk as far as you used to. Eventually, arthritis can cause you to lose mobility—limiting your ability to work and your quality of life.
  • Other chronic conditions. Arthritis often comes with a other problems—such as obesity, high blood pressure, diabetes and heart avodart cheap disease. Nearly half of adults with arthritis in the U.S. have at least one other health condition.

What can you do about it?

The numbers are daunting, but there is hope of relieving your arthritis pain and increasing your quality of life with these steps.

  • Get educated. Learn how to self-manage your pain. Programs such as the Arthritis Self-Management Program or Chronic Disease Self-Management Program may be available in your area. Ask your doctor to help you learn more about how to manage your arthritis.
  • Stay active. While it might seem like physical activity will worsen your pain, the opposite is true. Walking, swimming, dancing, or yoga can improve joints and ease pain. Take it slowly at first and increase in time or intensity as you are able.
  • Maintain a healthy weight. An extra 10 pounds of body weight is like adding 60 pounds of pressure to your knees. Losing even 10 pounds can make a huge difference in your mobility and quality of life.

Learn more about arthritis, its disabling potential, and the steps you can take to control it here: http://www.cdc.gov/chronicdisease/resources/publications/aag/arthritis.htm