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6,000 Steps Per Day May Be Enough for Those With Knee OA

Researchers from Boston University have found that walking reduces the risk of functional limitation associated with knee osteoarthritis (OA). The study, in part funded by the NIH (National Institutes of Health), was just published in Arthritis Care & Research. The researchers measured the daily steps taken by nearly 2,000 people with—or at risk for—knee OA. All participants were part of the Multicenter Osteoarthritis Study; each person had his or her walking measured for seven days and their functional limitation avodart online evaluated two years later.

Bottom line: Dr. Daniel White said, ” … despite the common popular goal of walking 10,000 steps per day, our study finds only 6,000 steps are necessary to realize benefits. We encourage those with or at risk of knee OA to walk at least 3,000 or more steps each day, and ultimately progress to 6,000 steps daily to minimize the risk of developing difficulty with mobility.”

Read the entire article in Orthopedics This Week.

How Much Does Physical Activity Help Maintain Mobility in Older Adults?

It’s something we’ve all heard: Exercise can help keep older adults healthy. But a new study, the first of its kind to focus on frail, older adults, proves that physical www.ourhealthissues.com/product-category/cholesterol-lowering/ activity can help these people maintain their mobility and dodge physical disability. The University of Florida study shows daily moderate physical activity may mean the difference between seniors being able to keep up everyday activities or becoming housebound. In fact, moderate physical activity helped aging adults maintain their ability to walk at a rate 18 percent higher than older adults who did not exercise.

Read the University of Florida Health article here.

Exercise Increases Independence for Older Adults

As we age, losing the ability to walk a short distance often means losing independence. Now researchers say they have found a treatment that, for some, can prevent the loss of mobility.

The prescription: a moderate exercise program. The program of walking, buy cheap avodart online strength training, stretches and balance exercises was tested on sedentary adults ages 70 to 89, all of whom started out in declining physical condition. Results were published in the medical journal JAMA.

Read the full article in USA Today.

To Age Well, Walk Frequently

Regular exercise, including walking, significantly reduces the chance that a frail older person will become physically disabled, according to one of the largest and longest-running studies of its kind to date. The results, generic avodart online published in the journal JAMA, reinforce the necessity of frequent physical activity for our aging parents, grandparents and, of course, ourselves.

Reported in the New York Times. Read the entire article here.

 

Osteoarthritis Patients are Better Off Walking

Orthopedics This Week reports on a study finding that osteoarthritis patients benefit from walking and should not fear that walking might cause increased damage to their joints. “People with osteoarthritis can decrease the possibility of developing physical limitations by walking more,” according to physical therapist Daniel K. White, Sc.D., PT, of Boston University, and his colleagues.

Key points:

  • Increased steps (1,000 more steps per day) were associated with a lower risk for later buy avodart online uk deterioration whether assessed on an objective performance-based measure or on a self-report measure.
  • Walkers who totaled 5,000 to 7,500 steps per day cut their risk of complications from osteoarthritis in half.
  • Less than one-third of primary care physicians advise their patients with osteoarthritis to walk.
  • White and his group suggest that physicians who are recommending walking to their patients set an initial goal of 3,000 steps per day.

Read the full article here.

 

Even the lightest of physical activity can help reduce disability

Here’s a study that disputes the old adage, “no pain, no gain.” According to a study published in British Medical Journal, results indicated that light-intensity physical activity is beneficial. Such activity can decrease your risk for the onset of osteoarthritis disability, or, if you already have that, can decrease the progression of the disability. The study was specific to knee osteoarthritis.

Dorothy Dunlop, buy avodart professor of medicine at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, points out that these findings can encourage patients who cannot increase their level of physical activity because of health limitations. She said, “We were delighted to see that more time spent during the day, simply moving your body, even at a light intensity, may reduce disability.” Read the full article here.

The Truth about Arthritis: You could become disabled.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, arthritis is the most common cause of disability in the United States. An estimated 50 million people currently suffer from some form of doctor-diagnosed arthritis. By the year 2030, that number is expected to increase to 67 million. These numbers are disproportionally high among women and minorities. Arthritis is also more common among obese people.

What’s the problem?

A little pain in your knees might not seem like much cause for concern, but arthritis can worsen over time—impacting your mobility and your quality of life.

  • High risk. If you are obese or have had a knee injury, your risk of developing arthritis is higher—46% of obese people and 57% of those with knee injuries will develop arthritis.
  • Disability. It starts slowly. Maybe one day you can’t climb stairs without pain or you can’t walk as far as you used to. Eventually, arthritis can cause you to lose mobility—limiting your ability to work and your quality of life.
  • Other chronic conditions. Arthritis often comes with a other problems—such as obesity, high blood pressure, diabetes and heart avodart cheap disease. Nearly half of adults with arthritis in the U.S. have at least one other health condition.

What can you do about it?

The numbers are daunting, but there is hope of relieving your arthritis pain and increasing your quality of life with these steps.

  • Get educated. Learn how to self-manage your pain. Programs such as the Arthritis Self-Management Program or Chronic Disease Self-Management Program may be available in your area. Ask your doctor to help you learn more about how to manage your arthritis.
  • Stay active. While it might seem like physical activity will worsen your pain, the opposite is true. Walking, swimming, dancing, or yoga can improve joints and ease pain. Take it slowly at first and increase in time or intensity as you are able.
  • Maintain a healthy weight. An extra 10 pounds of body weight is like adding 60 pounds of pressure to your knees. Losing even 10 pounds can make a huge difference in your mobility and quality of life.

Learn more about arthritis, its disabling potential, and the steps you can take to control it here: http://www.cdc.gov/chronicdisease/resources/publications/aag/arthritis.htm